Research

Sprinkling Spin Physics onto a Superconductor

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Jay Sau, in collaboration with physicists from Harvard and Yale, has been studying the effects of embedding magnetic spins onto the surface of a superconductor. They recently report in paper that was chosen as an "Editor's Suggestion" in Physical Review Letters, that the spins can interact differently than previously thought. This hybrid platform could be useful for quantum simulations of complex spin systems, having the special feature that the interactions may be controllable, something quite unusual for most condensed matter systems.

The textbook quantum system known as a spin can be realized in different physical platforms. Due to advances in fabrication and imaging, magnetic impurities embedded onto a substrate have emerged as an exciting prospect for studying spin physics. Quantum ‘spin’ is related to a particle’s intrinsic angular momentum. What’s neat is that while the concept is fairly abstract, numerous effects in nature, such as magnetism, map onto mathematical spin models.

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Research

Creating Optical Cables Out of Thin Air

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Imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space. That’s what Howard Milchberg, professor of physics and electrical and computer engineering at the University of Maryland, wants to do.

In a paper published in the July 2014 issue of the journal Optica, Milchberg and his lab report using an “air waveguide” to enhance light signals collected from distant sources. These air waveguides could have many applications, including long-range laser communications, detecting pollution in the atmosphere, making high-resolution topographic maps and laser weapons.

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Awards

Professor Eno Named UMD Distinguished Scholar-Teacher

Sarah Eno
Sarah Eno

Sarah Eno has been named a University of Maryland Distinguished Scholar-Teacher. Sarah is a brilliant physicist and a devoted educator who has served for the last two years as our Associate Chair for Graduate Education. She has always been extremely concerned about our education efforts, and a few years ago took the inititative to establish a physics lab staffed mostly by undergraduates, teaching them how to build and operate photodetectors and giving them priceless "real-world" experience.

As a researcher on the CMS experiment at CERN's LHC, Sarah is one of the most accomplished people in the field of particle physics. She has a really amazing ability to analyze data and understands hardware deeply.

She will give her Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 at 4PM in the Physics lecture hall.

Department of Physics


University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: 301.405.3401
Fax: 301.314.9525